Category Archives: jewish

Cosmic Marriage

Shavuot is thought of as a cosmic marriage between G-d + humans. It is a time for us to renew our vows with G-d, but what are those vows? For me, I experience G-d not as a separate superior, but as an all-enveloping living love. And my marriage with THAT has vows that can be best expressed through the following Rumi poem:

This Marriage
Rumi
May these vows and this marriage be blessed.
May it be sweet milk,
this marriage, like wine and halvah.
May this marriage offer fruit and shade
like the date palm.
May this marriage be full of laughter,
our every day a day in paradise.
May this marriage be a sign of compassion,
a seal of happiness here and hereafter.
May this marriage have a fair face and a good name,
an omen as welcome
as the moon in a clear blue sky.
I am out of words to describe
how spirit mingles in this marriage.

This time of year can also be a time in which you renew your vows with your romantic partner, and rededicate your lives to each other. Today, I rededicate my life to my partner, Brian, and together we strive to create a container of consciousness + delicious heart-exploding love in our home.

Advertisements

On the Sabbath, I Smell Like Jasmine

I remember reading a story about a mother who would welcome the Sabbath by wearing a special perfume on that day. I don’t know where this story came from, but I really liked the idea and it stuck with me. I envisioned the woman’s family recognizing that sweet scent, and knowing that the warmth of Shabbat was there. At some point, I decided to take this on as a personal practice. I picked Jasmine oil as my special scent because it felt peaceful and also wasn’t a scent that I normally used (normally, I smell like lavender, cinnamon, or just plain old patchouli hippie).

When my husband and I lived at Twin Oaks (an eco-village of 100 people on 600 acres), we would celebrate the Sabbath together by camping out by the river and praying/meditating all day. I loved how the jasmine scent that I wore gradually faded throughout the day and by sundown was mostly gone. Now that we are living together with a baby in a “normal” neighborhood, I put on my Sabbath jasmine oil and remember those beautiful days by the river. It also brings my attention back into the present moment, as a reminder that this day is not about doing, but is about BEING.

I came across the following description of the scent:

Jasmine fragrance is associated with inner feelings and aspirations. It is intensely floral but with a feminine modesty. Jasmine is a mood enhancer and aphrodisiac. Jasmine is a scent so unreserved that it purifies the emotions. It has been known to relieve melancholy. As a well-used scent, Jasmine provides strength in matters of spiritual love. It has a soothing effect on the inner-self and lends its scent well to meditation and contemplation.

Seems appropriate.

Plushie Seder Plate!

While thinking of ways to make Passover more fun for kids (and babies), I got the idea to make a festive seder plate that is entirely made out of plushie toys, paper mache, and other crafts. I made a paper mache “shank bone”, cloth lettuce bunch + yarn “parsley”, plushie “charoset” (the pink ball things), squeak-toy “horseradish” (the yellow thing) and a plushie “clump of horseradish”. I had a decorated wooden egg rattle-toy that I used as the roasted egg. Then I made a couple pieces of matzoh out of cardboard (probably tastes similar to the real stuff!) + decorated them with crayons. The plate itself was a plastic serving tray that I painted. Everything was made from recycled materials and my 1-year-old LOVED playing with it when I was done!

Fun Passover Crafts!

I put together a fun + meaningful haggadah, and now it is time to decorate the covers! I decided to do collage art, because it is something that the baby can participate in (ripping paper, yay!) without causing toooo much of a mess. Later, we’ll decorate the inside pages with crayons, and tie the pages together with colorful ribbons. Here are a couple of my favorite ones so far, and “how to” instructions below…

happy helper

FREE YOURSELF cover (look: she’s holding matzoh!)

MATZOH cover… mmmm

How To Make Your Own Haggadah Covers:

You will need:
– 8.5/11 card-stock paper (fun colors preferable)
– pictures to collage with (magazines, family photos, drawings, etc)
– scissors
– glue

Begin by finding the perfect pictures to create a picture that is both fun to look at + meaningful to you. Lay it out on the card-stock page to make sure it looks right before you start to glue. When the covers are finished + dry, use a hole-puncher to make 3 holes down the side (and do the same to the pages of your haggadah). Tie the booklets together with decorative ribbons. Enjoy!

Haggadah For A Meaningful Passover Seder

I wanted a haggadah with less dogma, and more meaningful/interactive stuff. I liked bits + pieces of several haggadot, so I decided to put together my own. I used a lot from Rachel Barenblat’s (“Velveteen Rabbi”) haggadah, and a lot of it I wrote myself. I left space for my family to decorate with crayons. Feel free to use some (or all) of this haggadah for your own Passover seder!

It begins with:
“Passover is the Jewish springtime festival: a time for renewal, returning, and rebirth. A Passover seder is a ritual feast in which we take time to fully experience each new taste we encounter, and (much like in a Japanese tea ceremony) everything is done purposefully, with awareness.”

Here is my haggadah for your downloading pleasure!
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1S1MUFmy6je3VJTM0zUjFVRLCL-5WcwHNFlTx85CfaG8/edit?hl=en

Skinny-Dipping Rainbow-Haired Orthodox Jewish Chicks

I have a fantasy of becoming a fully observant Jew, following all the “rules” in a way that is meaningful, bringing awareness into every action I take, and dressing the part (covered hair and all). I like this idea partly because I think it is sexy, partly because I have a perverse sense of humor, and partly because I imagine that living that way actually WOULD be extremely fulfilling emotionally + spiritually.

Sometimes I think that what’s stopping me is that the main people in my life aren’t observant whatsoever. I end up doing things like going out on Friday night with friends because I don’t want to miss out on the fun. I end up cooking my step-son breakfast on Saturday morning because he’s only with us on the weekends and I don’t want him to think of me as some weirdly religious evil step-mom who refuses him hot breakfasts. I don’t like the idea of hanging out with my alternative progressive feminist friends and them looking at me like I’m a loser while asking “so… WHY are you wearing that scarf thing on your head?”. I picture my husband in the background rolling his eyes while I attempt to dress modestly, making comments like “Hey but aren’t you that chick that I met on a commune, skinny-dipping and insisting we be polyamorous? Isn’t this a little out of character for you? Aren’t you just playing dress-up?”

And he’d be right. It would be totally weird for me to cover my hair out of “modesty”, because I don’t really get the whole modesty thing. I pretty much prefer to be naked or wearing a bright multicolored tutu and fairy wings at all times. I don’t see nakedness as inherently sexual or something that needs to be hidden. I’d also have a lot of problems with other Orthodox viewpoints (on subjects like gay marriage, gender roles, etc).

Because of my alternative/radical views on most subjects, I end up doing “Jewish stuff” with the more “open-minded” Jewish crowd. But my problem with that is that these groups are often small, unorganized, meet irregularly, and are less observant than me (with everyone driving on the Sabbath to go get more bacon-wrapped shrimp). I want to find a temple that feels like a home, and a group to worship with that feels like a family. Reform Synagogues feel too watered-down + “churchy” to me. I want the prayers to be in Hebrew. I want the people to be REALLY REALLY INTO IT and not just waiting around or reading along together in monotone voices. I feel like the passion is being hoarded by the ultra-Orthodox folks, and that I’m way too weird to hang out with them. When will I reach the end of my Blind Melon video and find my tribe of skinny-dipping rainbow-haired Orthodox Jewish chicks??

I realized today that the problem is that I have been imagining that there is only ONE correct way of being observant. I often think of the orthodox folks as having some sort of “magical authority” over what Judaism “IS”. But I also really like the quote “I practice my religion exactly the same way my ancestors did: I make it up as I go!”. I find absolutely nothing wrong with changing rituals to make them more meaningful to me. So now what I have to do is start being more observant, in a way that works for me, in a way that MEANS something to me. I will start by keeping the Sabbath EVERY week. I’m not sure what that means yet… but I am excited to find out!

“Eco Kosher” Artwork

The idea of “eco kosher” emerged within Jewish Renewal circles, inspired by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi. People have begun to ask questions like “Is it kosher to eat something that uses tons of non-renewable resources in packaging + shipping?” or “Is it kosher to use plastic plates that end up in landfills?”. Supporters of the idea of eco-kashrut realize that instead of taking G-d’s gifts for granted, we can live more sustainable lives and be in sync with nature.

I had been incorporating this idea into many aspects of my life beyond eating, and eventually realized that it also needed to merge with my artwork. I have begun using only recycled materials, to create “eco-kosher artwork”. Combining elements from embroidery, painting, quilting, and collage, I’m now creating unique pieces of art that invoke a feeling of divine energy and sacredness. For me, creating artwork is an intensely meditative and spiritual experience, and this feeling is only heightened for me now that I know my artwork is helping instead of harming the planet.

Mother Poetry and the Jewish “Divine Feminine”

There are many reasons that I love Rachel Barenblat.  I have been following her beautiful Torah commentary and poetry on The Velveteen Rabbi for years, and was delighted when she became pregnant at the same time that I did because her poetry began to follow the amazing journey of pregnancy and motherhood as I was having similar experiences.

I co-lead a workshop recently with Rachel Galper, about connecting with the ”Divine Feminine” (in a Jewish context) through art and storytelling.  My experience of divinity as female is directly linked to the intensity of my body bearing, birthing, and nourishing a child.  The following poem by Rachel Barenblat really captures this experience.  The poem is based on Psalm 126 and on her experiences of her first year as a mother:

ONE YEAR

A psalm of ascent

When the doctor brought you

through my narrow places

I was as in a dream: tucked behind

my closed eyes, chanting silently

we are opening up in sweet surrender.

The night before we left the hospital

I wept: didn’t they know

I had no idea what to do with you?

Even newborn-sized clothes

loomed around you, vast and ill-fitting.

I couldn’t convince you to latch

without a nurse there to reposition.

But we got into the car, the old world

made terrifying and new, and

in time I learned your language.

I had my own narrow places ahead,

the valley of the postpartum shadow.

Nights when I would hand you over,

mutely grateful to anyone willing

to rock you down, to suffer your cries…

But those who sow in tears

will reap in joy, and you

are the joy I never knew I didn’t have.

I have paced these long hours

bearing a baby on my shoulder

and now I am home in rejoicing,

bearing you, my own harvest.

http://velveteenrabbi.blogs.com/blog/mother-poems

 

Homegrown Judaica

Some of my artwork is being featured on the up-and-coming “Jewish etsy” art site Homegrown Judaica. They have some pretty cool ideas. Check them out!

“Founder and CEO, Rachel Silverman, earned a PresenTense 2011 Fellowship with the idea for creating a “Jewish Etsy” that allows local Jewish artists to sell their work to customers who care about buying local, supporting Jewish artists in their community, and, most importantly, purchasing high quality, hand-made items that are often one-of-a-kind.”

Gluten/dairy/sugar-free Hamantaschen! mmm

This picture is making me hungry. We avoid sugar + gluten + dairy, but don’t want to cook things that require a bunch of crazy expensive ingredients. This recipe seems simple enough… I may experiment with buckwheat (instead of almond) flour, coconut (instead of grapeseed) oil, and various sorts of fillings such as poppyseed + agave mmmm.

Raspberry Hamantaschen
2 cups blanched almond flour
½ teaspoon celtic sea salt
2 tablespoons grapeseed oil
2 tablespoons agave nectar
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1 tablespoon water
some raspberry jam

– In a large bowl, combine almond flour and salt
– In a smaller bowl, combine oil, agave, vanilla and water
– Mix wet ingredients into dry
– Chill dough in refrigerator 1 hour
– Roll out dough between 2 pieces of parchment paper ¼ – ½ inch thick
– Cut dough into circles (size of your choosing)
– Make a light indentation with your forefinger in the center of each circle
– Drop ½ teaspoon of raspberry jam into the center of each circle
– Fold the dough in to create 3 sides; pinch each of the 3 corners to form a triangle shaped cookie
– Bake at 350° for 8 minutes until cookies are golden brown around the edges
– Serve

original recipe + post:
http://www.elanaspantry.com/gluten-free-raspberry-hamantaschen